Our August Adventures in Geology

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In August we went on a trip with Mr. Patrick Nurre, a noted Christian geologist and author.  Our tour started in Bozeman, Montana where we met up with the other people on the tour.  Starting the next morning we went to the Lewis and Clark Caverns, then to Quake Lake and Hebgen Lake.  The next three days brought us to Yellowstone, and one day over the Beartooth Mountains.  The last two days we were in Glendive Montana where we stumbled upon a creation museum, and one worth going to.

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Mr. Nurre leading us!

At the Lewis and Clark Caverns we saw many amazing sites: limestone formations, the Crystal pool (known for it’s clearness), an amazing view, etc.

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We had a long hike to the opening of the Lewis and Clark Caverns.

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This is the big gash that serves as an opening to the Lewis & Clark Caverns.

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The Limestone structures were amazing!

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1 Mile high (underground).

Quake Lake was also an amazing site.  When we arrived at the lake I was surprised to see half of the mountain behind the lake missing!  Mr. Nurre explained that the half that was missing was shaken off by an earthquake (hence the name Quake  Lake).

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Quake Lake.

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Hebgen Lake

Yellow Stone was fun.  We saw Old Faithful erupt twice! And we went on the Yellowstone Board Walk.  It was really neat to see all the geysers, mud pots, steam vents, hot springs, and bacteria mats.  When I went on the Board Walk I started to feel sick.  Mommy explained that I was feeling sick because of all the sulfur, (an element).  On a bacteria mat the sulfur would be an orange color while the green was manganese.  In geysers, mud pots, steam vents, and hot springs the sulfur was in the form of steam so it had no color.  The water in geysers, mud pots, etc. is extremely hot, (hot as in you could die from falling in).

The Bear Tooth mountains were the prettiest mountains I have ever seen.  At the top there was an incredible view.  We saw a herd of big horned sheep.  We were looking down over a cliff at a beautiful lake when we saw the herd coming.  There is a picture of them at the bottom of the page.

The last two days we were on a separate tour (still with Mr. Nurre).  We went to a ranch near Glendive Montana.  We found fossil bones, a lot of petrified wood, flint, concretions (Iron balls), sand stone, and other rocks and minerals.  On the ranch there were two ladies who own it.  They were very kind and let us keep almost whatever we found.
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IMG_6887 This picture was taken from the Internet.

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SONY DSCSONY DSC We got to see Old Faithful erupt twice.

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We had a long hike and this was one of the markers to where the pool was.

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SONY DSC We found this out of the way pool that erupted about every 10 seconds.

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We found some time to go shopping in the town of West Yellowstone, MT where we stayed. A lot of the shops set out wooden bears, and this was one of them.

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10 thoughts on “Our August Adventures in Geology

  1. I’m sorry we had the layout nice at one point, but then the computer rearranged everything once it posted and we couldn’t figure out how to get it back. But thanks for following my blog!

    Like

  2. Hi Risa – I really enjoy your posts – especially this one! I really liked Yellowstone when we visited there, too. It looks like you had a great time and learned a lot.

    Keep learning!

    Jacki ( your Oma Phyllis’ friend)

    Like

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